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by Christina Wilson

Spring is here! If you're one of the unlucky who suffers from the springtime sniffles, you may be less than thrilled about the blooming and pollen that comes with the turn of the season. 

What can you do nutritionally? A lot! Gut health, diet, stress management, and sleep all help regulate the immune system. 

Using your diet to help control your allergies is a great way to naturally ease and prevent symptoms without putting your body through the process of breaking down medications. So if you're looking for a more holistic approach to allergy relief, focusing on your diet is a significant first step.

70 percent of our immune system is in our guts! Being mindful to include foods with probiotics and vitamin D are is always essential. Be mindful of how food makes you feel. If you notice that you feel a bit ickier after eating or drinking certain things, make a note of it. As there is no one size fits all diet, certain foods may help tame seasonal allergies while others may make them worse for some. However, the following have been found to work for most and may help you nip allergies in the bud!

Ginger

Ginger is a natural anti-inflammatory that may help reduce the symptoms of hay fever and other types of allergies. In addition, ginger can help boost your immune system, which can help treat allergies and prevent future attacks. Recent studies have shown that ginger can be an effective anti-inflammatory phytochemical agent. It also contains antioxidative compounds, which help reduce seasonal allergy symptoms. 

Turmeric

Turmeric is a spice used in Indian cooking and Ayurvedic remedies for centuries. It has many health benefits, including fighting inflammation and improving brain function. A recent study even found that it can help reduce the risk of Alzheimer's disease. Recent studies have shown that turmeric can be an effective natural treatment for seasonal allergies. In addition, Curcumin, the active compound in turmeric, has anti-inflammatory properties that can help treat allergy symptoms. 


Stinging Nettle

A common herb in natural medicine, stinging nettle, may also be a natural antihistamine. In a 2000 study, 58 percent of participants found their symptoms relieved with freeze-dried nettles, and 69 participants rated it better than the placebo. Stinging nettle can be found online and at health food stores. The study participants in question used 300 milligrams (mg) each day.


Quercetin

Quercetin is an antioxidant found naturally in onions, apples, and other produce. In addition, research has demonstrated the antihistamine effects of quercetin. You can purchase quercetin as a supplement or add more quercetin-rich foods to your diet.

HISTAMINE & THE ALLERGIC RESPONSE

Histamine is a chemical that occurs naturally in the body and in some foods. In healthy people, the naturally-occurring histamine we consume is quickly "deactivated" by enzymes in the gut. However, for those with allergies or histamine intolerance, there is either an unusually high production of histamine internally, the activity of the enzymes responsible for getting rid of it is unusually low, or both. So when you pile on many high-histamine foods and beverages, you have a recipe for headaches, nasal congestion, hives, fatigue, etc. Symptoms appear when more histamine is in your body than it can handle. So: if there's an overwhelming amount of histamine-inducing stuff for you to deal with at one time, you get allergy symptoms, a manifestation of what we'll call "histamine overload" or an overflowing "histamine bucket."

The low histamine diet may help some people with allergy symptoms. 

The following foods are known or suspected to support our body's ability to manage histamine. These foods are also full of antioxidants, which makes them an excellent addition to any diet.

  • Wild blueberries
  • Apples
  • Arugula or rocket lettuce
  • Watercress lettuce
  • Parsley
  • Celery
  • Cucumber
  • Broccoli
  • Fennel
  • Red onion 

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Christina Wilson
Christina Wilson

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